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Webinar Series

Live & On-Demand

Overview


The Society for Mucosal Immunology provides live webinars for member and non-member participation focused on the latest ideas and concepts of immunity at mucosal surfaces. Registration and access to the on-demand webinar recording library is free to all SMI members. Non-members are invited to join us for the live webinar at a nominal registration rate of $25/webinar.

2021 Webinar Series Co-chairs

Katharina Lahl, PhD - Technical University of Denmark
Rodney Newberry, MD - Washington University School of Medicine
Lauren A. Zenewicz, PhD - The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

How To View

All registrants will receive the login instructions at the email address used to register in advance of the webinar session.

Members can access the on-demand webinar library through the member login portal.

Registration

Registration for each webinar session is separate and linked to in the below webinar description. Members access the free member registration rate by first signing in to the SMI website.

Webinar Schedule

Thursday, May 20, 2021 – 2:00 pm CT

ILCs and IELs

Presented By:
Gregory F. Sonnenberg, PhD, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University
Danyvid Olivares-Villagomez, PhD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

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Presenter:
Gregory F. Sonnenberg, PhD, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University
Topic:
Immune regulation of intestinal health
Bio:

Dr. Gregory F. Sonnenberg received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and was a recipient of a NIH Directors Award that established the Sonnenberg Laboratory in 2012. In 2014, Dr. Sonnenberg was recruited to Weill Cornell Medicine where he is currently an Associate Professor of Microbiology & Immunology in Medicine. Dr. Sonnenberg’s laboratory interrogates the regulation and functional contributions of host-microbe interactions during health, inflammation and cancer.

Description:

The human immune system is critical to protect against infection with pathogenic microorganisms.  However, inappropriate immune responses against our own tissues or non-harmful environmental triggers such as beneficial commensal bacteria that normally colonize the body’s barrier surfaces can promote autoimmune or chronic inflammatory diseases.  Indeed, emerging studies in patient populations indicate that abnormal host immune responses to commensal bacteria are causally-linked to the pathogenesis and progression of numerous chronic infectious, inflammatory and metabolic diseases, such as HIV, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer.  The focus and long-term research goals of the Sonnenberg Laboratory are to interrogate functional interactions between the mammalian immune system and intestinal commensal bacteria in the context of health and disease.  The laboratory employs cutting-edge immunologic and microbiologic approaches to interrogate these interactions in both basic mouse models and translational patient-based studies.  Recent studies in the laboratory have identified multiple essential roles for innate lymphoid cells in orchestrating host relationships to defined subsets of commensal bacteria and maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Delineating these complex interactions will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory diseases, and direct the future development of novel preventative, therapeutic, and curative strategies targeting innate lymphoid cells to promote intestinal health.


Presenter:
Danyvid Olivares-Villagomez, PhD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Topic:
A rare lymphocyte, a common protein and a killer enzyme: The tale of iCD8a cells, osteopontin and granzymes in mucosal immune responses
Bio:

Dr. Oliveres-Villagomez is originally from Mexico City where he obtained a B.Sc. degree from the National and Autonomous University of Mexico. After graduation he moved to Vanderbilt University for a Master’s degree in Biology, studying the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in human heart samples. Dr. Oliveres-Villagomez obtained his Ph.D. degree from New York University under the supervision of Juan Lafaille, working with regulatory T cells in the spontaneous model of experimental allergic encephalomyeilitis. After completion of his degree, he started a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Luc Van Kaer at Vanderbilt University, where he started his career in mucosal immunology primarily investigating the role of the Thymus Leukemia (TL) antigen in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) effector functions. He currently is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The focus of his research is a novel innate immune IEL discovered and characterized in his laboratory, referred to as innate CD8aa) cells (or iCD8a cells) with special emphasis on their role during intestinal inflammation and homeostasis.

Description:

Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) constitute one of the largest immune populations in the body. IEL reside in between intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and comprise a diverse population of cells. Most IEL express a T cell receptor, either ab or y8, but a small population are TCR-negative cells. Innate CD8aa IEL (known as iCD8a cells) constitute a significant fraction of TCR-negative IEL, which are characterized for their high expression of CD8aa homodimer. iCD8a cells express the phosphoprotein osteopontin, a molecule involved in several physiological processes. Our group has shown that iCD8a cell-derived osteopontin is an important molecule impacting IEL homeostasis. In addition, iCD8a cells express granzymes, enzymes primarily known for their role in cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Preliminary data from our laboratory suggest that iCD8a cells do not possess cytotoxic properties, but instead secrete granzymes which have the potential to modulate mucosal immune responses. These observations highlight the importance of this rare lymphocyte population in the homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium.

 

 


 

Past Recorded Webinars

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR DISSECTION OF THE NEW FOOD ALLERGY DISEASE EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS

Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD
July 14, 2020

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REGULATORY NATURAL KILLER CELL RESPONSES SHAPE THE OUTCOME OF CO-INFECTION BY LUNG AND GUT PATHOGENS

Laurel L. Lenz, PhD
August 11, 2020

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INJURY AND REPAIR OF THE ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL BARRIER

By Rachel Zemans, MD
September 1st, 2020

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MUCOSAL THERAPIES: RESOLUTION RESPONSES IN ORAL CAVITY

By Thomas Van Dyke DDS, PhD
September 15th, 2020

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HARNESSING THE MICROBIOME FOR IBD THERAPY

By Ramnik Xavier MD, PhD
November 10th, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - MICROBIOTA

November 12th, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - ADAPTIVE IMMUNITY

November 17th, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - MECHANISMS OF INFLAMMATION

November 19th, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - MUCOSAL IMMUNOBIOLOGY

November 24th, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - MUCOSAL COLONIZATION

December 1st, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - HOST-MICROBE INTERACTIONS

December 3rd, 2020

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ABSTRACT ORAL PRESENTATION WEBINARS - Mucosal Epithelial Cells

March 16th, 2021

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Sponsor & Exhibitor Opportunities

SMI educational programing provides an ideal opportunity to showcase your organization’s products and services and have direct interface with mucosal immunologists from around the globe.